Combined effects of obesity and type 2 diabetes contribute to increased risk in premenopausal women

Journal Article
, Alokail MS, Al-Daghri NM, Al-Attas OS, Hussain T. . 2009
Publication Work Type: 
PHD
Magazine \ Newspaper: 
Cardiovasc Diabetol
Volume Number: 
8(1)
Pages: 
33
Publication Abstract: 

BACKGROUND:

Both obesity and type 2 diabetes are among the risk factors for breast cancer development. Combined effect of these metabolic abnormalities on breast cancer risk however, has not been examined in premenopausal women. We tested this association in type 2 diabetic women, categorized as obese, overweight and normal body weight groups based on BMI.

DESIGN AND METHODS:

A total of 101 subjects were included in this study. Serum levels of IL-6, TNF-alpha, C reactive protein, leptin, TGF-alpha, adiponectin and insulin were measured by ELISA. Data were logarithmically transformed for variables not normally distributed. Analysis of variance with post-hoc Bonferroni was applied to compare the data between the groups. Simple and partial correlation coefficients between the variables were determined and a stepwise multiple linear regression analysis was performed to determine the relationships between the variables of interest.

RESULTS:

Significantly increased levels of IL-6, C reactive protein, leptin and significantly decreased levels of adiponectin were found in obese group, while the levels of TNF-alpha and TGF-alpha were unaltered. A positive correlation between waist circumference and IL-6 was found in obese group. Similarly, C reactive protein, waist and hip circumferences were linearly correlated with BMI in obese group. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis revealed several significant predictors for breast cancer risk.

CONCLUSION:

Obesity and type 2 diabetes, owing to their effects on adipocytokines and inflammatory mediators, contribute to increased breast cancer risk in premenopausal women. This study emphasizes healthy life style and better management of these metabolic disorders to avoid the pathogenesis of breast cancer and of other chronic diseases.