Vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms are associated with obesity and inflammosome activity.

Journal Article
, Al-Daghri NM, Guerini FR, Al-Attas OS, Alokail MS, Alkharfy KM, Draz HM, Agliardi C, Costa AS, Saulle I, Mohammed AK, Biasin M, Clerici M., . 2014
Publication Work Type: 
PHD
Magazine \ Newspaper: 
PLoS One
Volume Number: 
14;9(7)
Publication Abstract: 

To explore the mechanisms underlying the suggested role of the vitamin D/vitamin D receptor (VDR) complex in the pathogenesis of obesity we performed genetic and immunologic analyses in obese and non-obese Saudi individuals without other concomitant chronic diseases. Genomic DNA was genotyped for gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of VDR by allelic discrimination in 402 obese (body mass index –BMI≥30 kg/m2) and 489 non-obese (BMI<30 kg/m2) Saudis. Q-PCR analyses were performed using an ABI Prism 7000 Sequence Detection System. The inflammosome pathway was analysed by PCR, cytokines and plasma lipopolysaccaride (LPS) concentrations with ELISA assays. Results showed that the VDR SNPs rs731236 (G) (TaqI) and rs1544410 (T) (Bsm-I) minor allele polymorphisms are significantly more frequent in obese individuals (p = 0.009, β = 0.086 and p = 0.028, β = 0.072, respectively). VDR haplotypes identified are positively (GTA) (p = 0.008, β = 1.560); or negatively (ACC) (p = 0.044, β = 0.766) associated with obesity and higher BMI scores. The GTA "risk" haplotype was characterized by an up-regulation of inflammosome components, a higher production of proinflammatory cytokines (p<0.05) and a lower VDR expression. Plasma LPS concentration was also increased in GTA obese individuals (p<0.05), suggesting an alteration of gut permeability leading to microbial translocation. Data herein indicate that polymorphisms affecting the vitamin D/VDR axis play a role in obesity that is associated with an ongoing degree of inflammation, possibly resulting from alterations of gut permeability and microbial translocation. These results could help the definition of VDR fingerprints that predict an increased risk of developing obesity and might contribute to the identification of novel therapeutic strategies for this metabolic condition.