Previous Courses

Below are the literature and language skills courses I have been teaching through the years, some from the old plan while others are from the new plan. 

Eng 109 – Reading Skills and Vocabulary Building (Level: 2, Credit: 3 hrs)
     This course aims to develop the students' reading and comprehension skills. This is achieved through an intensive practice in reading and learning new vocabulary, assisting students to separate fact from opinion, guessing the meaning from context and learning to summarize. 

Eng 111 – Basic Language Skills (Level: 1, Credit: 3 hrs)
     This is a grammar/writing course which teaches students basic sentence writing skills. It gradually moves from basic sentence structures to complex sentences with the aim to prepare students for upcoming composition and writing courses. By the end of the course, students should acquire the following skills:

  1. Be familiar with the correct formation of the basic sentence patterns in the English language to be able to write correct, meaningful, complete sentences.
  2. Be able to identify independent sentence elements and differentiate between sentence types.

Eng 112 – Listening and Speaking I (Level: 1, Credit: 2 hrs)
     The course aims to train the students to develop their speaking and listening skills so that at the end of the course they will be able to handle specific communicative tasks. The focus of the course will be on practical language use. Students learn how to present their topics in the most comprehensive, convincing manner and are guided to strengthen their points of weakness. They  are encouraged to enhance their presentation skills and are guided should they face any difficulty concerning their manner of presentation (e.g. body language, talking speed...etc).
 
Eng 113 – Reading Comprehension I (Level: 1, Credit: 2 hrs)
     The course aims at introducing students to and training them in reading strategies and skills. It will address the following skills and strategies: mechanics of reading, reading techniques (elementary skimming and scanning), vocabulary skills (use of contextual, syntactic, and morphological clues to improve vocabulary comprehension) and extracting general information. Student learn to practice and apply reading skills such as skimming to find required information like guessing the meanings of words from context, finding the topic and main idea, etc. By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Answer relevant comprehension questions on any given text.
  2. Apply different reading techniques: elementary skimming and scanning.
  3. Use contextual, syntactic, and morphological clues to guess the meaning of new vocabulary and to extract general meaning.

Eng 114 – Composition I (Level: 2, Credit: 3 hrs)
     In this course, students are introduced to basic writing concepts in which the main focus of the course is to teach them how to write a proper paragraph. By the end of the course, students will be familiar with:
     1. The stages of writing such as prewriting and brainstorming.
     2. The importance of unity and coherence in a paragraph.
     3. Identifying the topic sentence and be able to write one in their paragraph.
     4. Identifying the topic and controlling idea within the topic sentence.
     5. Telling the difference between the topic and controlling idea.
     6. Writing a narrative paragraph and include grammatical aspects such as adverbs of time.
     7. Writing a descriptive paragraph including grammatical aspects such as adverbs of place and
         manner as well as vocabulary dealing with describing people, places or things.

Eng 115 – Reading Comprehension II (Level: 2, Credit: 3 hrs)
     This course introduces students to various reading strategies and skills to enhance their understanding of texts. Various reading texts, such as magazine articles, textbook passages, essays, and website articles, are explored. Students are encouraged to read such texts actively and analytically. Students should be able to:
     1. Read a variety of unseen passages and answer comprehension questions.
     2. Guess the meanings of words from context.
     3. Analyze paragraphs and skim for the main idea (explicit or implicit).
     4. Scan (for numbers, facts, definitions of key terms, words, specific terms, etc.).
     5. Distinguish between general and specific statements.
     6. Paraphrase main ideas.
     7. Identify points of view.
     8. Identify basic elements of narratives (setting, characters and plot).
     9. Analyze affixes, compound words, and identify antonyms and synonyms.
     10. Summarize by listing key points.

Eng 116 – Grammar (Level: 2, Credit: 3 hrs)
     This course teaches students how to properly form grammatically correct sentences, so that they are able to practice what they have learned in both writing and speaking. The course teaches students  how to: 
     1. Identify the different types of English sentence structures.
     2. Use correctly grammatical elements such as verb tenses, modals, voice, reported speech,
        and conditional sentences.

Eng 118 – Translation (Level: 1, Credit: 2 hrs)
     Translation courses are used both to enhance students’ familiarity with English usage and sentence structure and to point out contrasts between Arabic and English in this respect. English 118 is both practical and introductory in nature. Students will be able to:

  1. Practice translating new short sentences from English to Arabic then more to translating short paragraphs.
  2. Learn to differentiate between the Arabic and the English structure and their different styles.

Eng 120 – Vocabulary Building (Level: 1 , Credit: 2 hrs)
    This course introduces students to vocabulary that is to be used in various scenarios, which aims to improve their communication skills both inside and outside the classroom. By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Write the meanings of 450 newly introduced words.
  2. Spell these new words.
  3.  Use these new words in meaningful sentences.
  4. Change the part of speech of these words.

Eng 122 – Listening and Speaking II (Level: 2, Credit: 2 hrs)
     This course teaches students how to effectively deliver presentations. Students learn how to present their topics in the most comprehensive, convincing manner and are guided to strengthen their points of weakness. They are encouraged to enhance their presentation skills and are guided should they face any difficulty concerning their manner of presentation (e.g. body language, talking speed...etc).
 
Eng 181 – Introduction to Literary Forms (Level: 2, Credit: 3 hrs)
     This course introduces students to fiction, poetry and drama as literary forms. In each form, they are introduced to key terms as well as assigned selected works as examples to illustrate the forms, themes and meanings behind such forms. They learn to examine literary works from an analytical point of view. By the end of the course, students learn to:

  1. Identify the three main genres of literature: fiction (short stories), poetry, and drama.
  2. Discuss the three main genres of literature: fiction (short stories), poetry, and drama.
  3. Analyze elements of each genre and trace these elements in specific works.
  4. Read literature both analytically and responsively.

Eng 212 – Translation I (Level: 3, Credit: 2 hrs)
     In this translation course, students practice translation in both English and Arabic. By the end of the course, they learn to:

  1. Translate unseen English passages to proper Arabic and vice versa in a given time.
  2. Use the dictionary (English to Arabic – Arabic to English) effectively to precisely translate difficult vocabularies within their context.
  3. Practice different kinds of passages while emphasizing the importance of remaining faithful to the text in providing the general meaning of a certain passage.

Eng 213 – Composition II (Level: 3, Credit: 2 hrs)
     This is a writing course in which students learn how to write a proper well-developed essay. By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Apply the use of a writing sequence, starting with prewriting activities, brainstorming, outlining, and ending with drafting, and editing
  2. Properly write a four paragraph essay on unseen topics, consisting of an introduction, three developmental paragraphs and a conclusion
  3. Write different types of essays on unseen topics: example essay and the compare-and-contrast essay. 

Eng 214 – Foundations of Rhetoric and Writing (Level: 3, Credit: 2 hrs)
      This writing course introduces students to basic writing concepts that will enhance their writing skills in order to produce proper academic writing. By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate understanding and appreciation for writing as a process that involves prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing.
  2. Understand and use conventions and strategies of rhetoric and writing such as purpose, audience and context.
  3. Understand and use different modes of writing such as description, comparison and persuasion.
  4. Develop the ability to write coherent and well-developed paragraphs and essays.

Eng 216 – Reading Literature (Level: 4, Credit: 3 hrs)
     Students are introduced to fiction, poetry and drama as literary genres. By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the three main genres of literature: fiction (short stories), poetry, and drama.
  2. Analyze the elements of each genre and trace these elements in specific works.
  3. Relate general as well as specific historical and cultural background materials crucial to the understanding of literature.
  4. Write coherent essays on the different elements of literature and their role in enriching the reading experience.
  5. Read literature both analytically and responsively.

Eng 231 – Appreciating Poetry (Level: 4, Credit: 2 hrs)
     This course is dedicated to the literary genre of poetry. Students are introduced to poems of various ages, forms and themes and learn to examine them from an analytic point of view. By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Define poetry as a specific literary genre and distinguish it from other literary genres.
  2. Paraphrase and Summarize a poem in order to understand its meaning.
  3. Analyze imagery and figurative language as elements of poetry.
  4. Identify speaker, tone, situation, and setting as elements of poetry and connect these elements to the meaning of the text.
  5. Analyze sound and rhythm as elements of poetry and understand their role in making meaning in the text.
  6. Write an analysis of a poem in standard English.

Eng 251 – The Rise of the Novel (Level: 3, Credit: 3 hrs)
     This course explores the social, historical factors that lead to the rise of the English novel in the 18th century. Two novels are assigned as representatives of the age. By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the genesis and early development as well as the fundamentals of the English novel.
  2. Explain terms such as plot, characterization, setting and narrative style.
  3. Discuss terms such as plot, characterization, setting and narrative style in relation to specific novels.
  4. Discuss relevant intellectual issues.
  5. Identify characteristics of the eighteenth century novel in relation to its social and political context.
  6. Discuss characteristics of the eighteenth century novel in relation to its social and political context.
  7. Apply the range of theoretical and critical approaches in relation to the study of the novel.

Eng 271 – Writing about Literature (Level: 4, Credit: 3 hrs)
     This writing course focuses on introducing students to literary approaches that will guide them to write proper academic essays on a literary subject from an analytical point of view. By the end of the course, students will be able to:  

  1. Write academic essays of several paragraphs on literary works.
  2. Analyze the historical and cultural contexts and their influence on literary works.
  3. Employ correct grammar in the following points: tenses, modifiers, prepositions and rules of punctuation.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of the process of developing formal, academic essays and the short research paper.
  5. Employ literary criticism and theory in writing about literature.

Eng 332 – Romantic Poetry (Level: 5, Credit: 3 hrs)
     This course begins by introducing students to major features of English Romantic poetry, then examining assigned texts of major Romantic poets. By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Discuss the English Romantic literary movement and its main figures (canonized/sub-canonized) and literary characteristics.
  2.  Analyze the intellectual, historical, political and social background relevant to an understanding of English Romanticism.
  3. Read and Analyze a large selection of Romantic poems.
  4. Discuss several critical approaches to poetry.

Eng 371 – Introduction to American Literature (Level: 4, Credit: 3 hrs)
     This course chronologically examines social and historical factors that lead to the rise and shaping of American literature in its different forms, starting from the colonial period to the 20th century. In addition to social and historical background, assigned texts from each period are explored as representatives of their age. By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Discuss American literature in its different genres.
  2. Analyze the social and political circumstances which affected the thought and traditions of the prominent writers of America and the literary movement.
  3. Discuss the different social, economical and political experiences which exist in the American literature.
  4. Explain the characteristics of the American literature and the elements needed to analyze different works.
  5. Analyze American literary works of their own choice and on their own
  6. Write research papers in which they analyze a work of their choice.

Eng 374 – Survey of American Literature (Level: 6, Credit: 3 hrs)
     
This course offers a survey of American Literature from 1620 to the present. The course begins with readings from Native American Literature. Emphasis will be on the major American writers, the canon. In addition, a novel is studied along with samples of the writings of the major writers. 

Eng 411 – Translation II (Level: 6, Credit: 2 hrs)
     In this translation course, students practice translating from Arabic to English only. By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Produce grammatically and structurally correct English translation of various unseen Arabic texts of different types.
  2. Communicate the connotative meaning of the original text as well as its pragmatic effect.

Eng 412 – Speech (Level: 5, Credit: 2 hrs)
     In this speaking course, students practice delivering presentations from an analytical point of view as they are assigned persuasive as well as argumentative topics. By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Produce both informative and persuasive presentations on several topics.
  2. Discuss ideas and different topics efficiently.
  3. Employ external references and statistics in a professional way.
  4. Interpret the presentations topics according to the students’ personal inputs, ideas, and beliefs.
  5. Employ correct language and presentation skills.

Eng 446 – Shakespeare (Level: 7, Credit: 3 hrs) - AS ASSISTANT
     This course introduces students to the social, historical and political circumstances in 16th century England, that gave way to the rise and shaping of drama mainly that of Shakespeare’s. by the end of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Critically read Shakespeare's individual plays.
  2. Discuss the characteristics of drama as a literary genre as well as a theatrical event.
  3. Discuss Elizabethan concepts and the age of the Renaissance.
  4. Analyze the language, techniques, characters and themes of a Shakespearean comedy and tragedy.
  5. Deliver oral presentations about the age, the playwright, or the genre.
  6. Write critical essays about the assigned plays.

Eng 451 – Modern British Novel (Level: 8, Credit: 3 hrs) - AS ASSISTANT
     This course aims at a presentation of the emergence of the modern British novel and development of the modern novel in the light of avant-garde movements, mass culture, and theories of the novel. By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Analyze individual modern novels; understand the emergence and development of the modern novel in the light of avant-garde movements, mass culture, and theories of the novel.
  2. Be aware of the significance of the range of innovative narrative techniques employed in modern fiction.
  3. Compare and contrast various novels in reference to modernism, war and alienation

Eng 452 – 19th Century Novel (Level: 8, Credit: 3 hrs) - AS ASSISTANT
     The course focuses on the expansiveness of the Victorian novel with close analysis of two novels. Socio-political and philosophic al contexts are subordinated to the way the nineteenth-century writer made use of the novel form. Novels are chosen from the output of Dickens, the Brontes, Thackeray, Trollope, Eliot, Meredith and Hardy. By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Understand  ''realism'' as a theory, cultural practice, and literary debate in the Victorian era.
  2. Identify and Discuss the cultural and historical contexts in which Victorian novels were produced, and read.
  3. Recognize and Discuss the key novel genres such as historical, sensation, bildungsroman, social problem, provincial and imperial adventure.
Course Materials